Our unhealthy obsession with work

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Photo by Bethany Legg on Unsplash

Mental health is a topic I have started to pay a lot closer attention to.

With work, comes pressure and expectation. Thankfully, these days it’s less about being ‘seen’ to work hard, and more about what you can achieve and how you go about doing that.

In my spare time, I play a small part in helping to run a community for recruiters, called DBR. I was talking to one of my friends in the community recently about the pressures of work and trying to achieve a good work-life balance. Something they said really stuck with me:

I got back from holiday and was like “omg I need to work late every night to make up for going away”

It stuck with me for a couple of reasons 1) I’ve been there myself 2) That level of worry and stress is not good.

So how do we stop work from becoming an unhealthy obsession, even an addiction?

Physical and Mental Health

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Me and my bro shortly after completing the 2014 London Marathon

At the moment, I’m training for the London Marathon. It will be my third London Marathon and my sixth overall. I’ve learnt a heck of a lot about how my body works and my limits, both physically and mentally. When you train too much, you’re tired and injuries soon follow. You’re forced to rest up and recover. You literally don’t have a choice.

 

When it comes to work, it’s not always that easy (or obvious). I’ve been seriously guilty of letting it run my life. Mondays to Fridays were off limits for social events as I’d be totally consumed by wanting to solve every work nag that was on my mind. Whilst 10pm is bedtime for some, I’d still be sat there working myself into a frenzy about what I hadn’t yet done ahead of the next day. It was unhealthy and, frankly, made me really unhappy. I didn’t recognise myself, was short-tempered and generally not a great person to be around.

Then last year, I heard some shocking news about a former colleague. It stopped me in my tracks. I was compelled me to take a closer look at my own mental health. More specifically where I draw the line between work and pleasure. Whilst I’m still quite an obsessive person, I’ve learnt both by myself and through the help of others that taking care of yourself is more important (and leads to better results anyway). It’s taught me that rest and recovery from intensive spells of work are just as important as when training.

How can you strike a balance?

The majority of things you do at work are important but not everything is urgent. When you’re there work hard, really hard but ruthlessly prioritise what actually needs to be now and what can actually wait for the next 12+ hours until you’re back the next day.

Here are a few practical tips to help switch off from work:

  • Snooze Slack notifications
  • Android users — separate ‘Work’ and ‘Personal’ profiles on your phone. (Or if you’re like me, just turn your work phone off when you get home)
  • Set office hours on your calendar so that colleagues know when scheduling meetings

We all have a responsibility to not only talk about our mental health but also to live by what we say, both for ourselves, our colleagues & friends. There will always be occasions when we need to work longer hours or get stressed out — we’re human after all. These, however, should be the exception rather than the norm and I challenge you all to think about how you can make that a reality.

First and foremost, look after yourself and look after each other. If you don’t look after yourself before and during a marathon, you’ll hit what is known as ‘The Wall’. From experience, it’s not a great place to be in.

Why wouldn’t you take work-life balance as seriously?

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I’m running the London Marathon in support of Mind, the mental health charity. If you would like to support this great charity please follow this link to my fundraising page — https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/kristian-bright